Climate Change: Reality or Fiction? Exploring the State of the Climate and Historical Perspective

Despite widespread assertions of a "climate crisis," recent data from the science community tells a different story. This week, we highlight the 2023 "State of the Climate" report by Ole Humlum, which emphasizes observational data over numerical models to provide a more realistic assessment of Earth's climate. Humlum highlights various natural variations in climate metrics like temperature, sea level, and precipitation and emphasizes the complex interplay of factors in the Earth's climate system.

Furthermore, a recent report by the Global Warming Policy Foundation argues that many claims of extreme weather events being attributable to climate change are exaggerated or unfounded. The report illustrates how many modern weather extremes, including heatwaves, floods, and droughts, do not surpass the severity of past events. This casts doubt on the reliability of claims that the climate crisis is causing more extreme weather.

Additionally, Ken Haapala of the Science and Environmental Policy Project highlights the misuse of the linear no threshold model by organizations arguing for catastrophic climate change. This model assumes a direct cause-and-effect relationship between carbon dioxide levels and temperature, ignoring the complexity of the Earth's climate system and the ability of living organisms to adapt and repair.

Finally, Climate: The Movie, a documentary discussing the underlying causes and alleged consequences of the "climate crisis," is examined through a bibliography of resources on its production. The movie eschews skepticism and evidence in favor of emotionally compelling but scientifically questionable assertions to support its argument that fossil fuels are destroying the planet.

Overall, this week emphasizes the complexity of the Earth's climate system, the importance of historical perspective, and the need for accurate communication of climate science through critique of climate change rhetoric and the linear no threshold model.


State of the Climate: An Evidence-Based Approach This week's article discusses the science of climate change, focusing on the contrasting views of two organizations: The Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP) and the Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF). The GWPF's "State of the Climate, 2023" report provides a comprehensive assessment of Earth's climate based on observational data rather than numerical models, highlighting natural variations in climate metrics like temperature, sea level, and precipitation. Furthermore, it emphasizes the complex interplay of various factors in the Earth's climate system rather than relying on simplified linear models. The SEPP, on the other hand, questions the misuse of the linear no threshold model by organizations arguing for catastrophic climate change impacts, emphasizing that living organisms can repair damage and adapt to changing conditions.

Historical Perspective on Climate Change: A recent report by the GWPF, "Weather Extremes in Historical Context," challenges the popular belief that modern weather extremes are more frequent and intense due to climate change. The report illustrates that many extreme weather events, including heatwaves, floods, and droughts, have matched or exceeded the severity of past events, casting doubt on the reliability of claims that the climate crisis is causing more extreme weather. Additionally, it highlights the role of modern technology in increasing awareness of weather events, showing that collective memories of extreme weather are short-lived.

Critique of Climate Change Rhetoric and the Linear No Threshold Model Ken Haapala of SEPP discusses the misuse of the linear no threshold model by organizations arguing for catastrophic climate change. This model assumes a direct cause-and-effect relationship between carbon dioxide levels and temperature, ignoring the complexity of the Earth's climate system and the ability of living organisms to repair damage and adapt to changing conditions. Haapala argues that the model is overly simplified and ignores the adaptive capabilities of living organisms.

Evaluation of a Climate Change Documentary: Climate: The Movie The bibliography of resources on the production of the documentary "Climate: The Movie" is presented, highlighting the movie's use of emotionally compelling but scientifically questionable assertions to support the argument that fossil fuels are destroying the planet. The movie avoids a balanced approach and criticism in favor of emotionally appealing but scientifically suspect content to support its argument.

In conclusion, this week's materials emphasize the complexity of the Earth's climate system and the importance of historical perspective in understanding climate change. They question the reliability of claims that the climate crisis causes more extreme weather and highlight the misuse of linear models in arguing for catastrophic climate change. Additionally, the bibliography of resources on the production of "Climate: The Movie" is presented, revealing its biased and scientifically questionable assertions.