The 100 Fights That Shaped Action Cinema

The 100 Fights That Shaped Action Cinema

The 100 fights that changed the action genre as we know it.

1. The Corbett-Fitzsimmons Fight

(1897)

While not the first fight committed to film, this is the first fight that made the filmmakers (and their distributors) some serious money. The fight lasted between 71 and 100 minutes, depending on who was exhibiting it, and introduced the concept of a feature-length motion picture, as well as the first pay-per-view sporting event.

2. The Fight From 'Anchorman'

(2004)

At this point, Ron Burgundy is an anchor at the local San Diego news and his reputation is on the line when a fight breaks out at a press conference. A memorable moment in this fight involves Ron Burgundy shouting "Stay away from the camera, stay away from the camera!" as he tries to continue reporting.

3. The Fight From 'Bridget Jones's Diary'

(2001)

This fight proved that fights aren't just for action movies. In this comic battle, Bridget Jones (played by Renee Zellweger) slugs it out with her jealous coworker, Stella (played by Sienna Miller), over their shared love interest, Mark (played by Colin Firth).

4. The Fight From 'College'

(1927)

It's rare to see physical comedy that also features an exciting fight scene. In this climactic scene, Keaton's character Ronald struggles to win his girlfriend Mary back after she's taken hostage by his rival, Jeff. With a series of escalating gags, the fight becomes more and more ridiculous (and hilarious) as Ronald uses anything he can find to attack Jeff while refraining from actually punching him.

5. The Fight From 'They Live'

(1988)

Not many fights can take place in a grocery store and still be considered exciting, but they manage to do so in this scene. The fight is over in just six minutes, but it's thrilling and brutal, ending with a satisfying finish as the protagonist sends an enemy into a wall of television sets.

6. The Fight From 'Fight Club'

(1999)

This is the fight that divides the world into those who want to fight and those who don't. It's also a powerful critique of capitalism, as the men fighting are just trying to buy furniture. The scene is a wild ride that will be seared into your memory.

7. The Fight From 'Warrior'

(2011)

This fight is a bit different from the others because it's not just a fight between two people, it's a fight between a man and his own demons. The scene is a powerful and emotional climax to the story of a man struggling to come to terms with his past and find his place in the world.

8. The Fight From 'The Matrix'

(1999)

This fight is a great example of the innovative and stylized fighting in The Matrix. The scene also provides a compelling commentary on the blurring of the lines between the real world and the digital world.

9. The Fight From 'Annie Hall'

(1977)

This fight is a hilarious and absurd depiction of a physical confrontation between two neurotic people who are probably just trying to get rid of some steam.

10. The Fight From 'Raiders of the Lost Ark'

(1981)

It's exciting and funny, with a great payoff at the end. It also has a bit of a twist at the end, with the hero losing the fight but still winning in the end.

Conclusion

Action cinema is a genre that constantly pushes the boundaries of what is possible on screen, and the fights in these films are a large part of that innovation. From the early days of silent films to the blockbuster franchises of today, action cinema has always relied on exciting, innovative fights to keep audiences coming back for more. As the genre continues to evolve, it will be interesting to see what new fights will be added to the list of classics.

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