VW’s Chattanooga Plant Votes To Unionize, Becomes First Southern Auto Plant To Do So In 80 Years

VW's Chattanooga Plant Votes To Unionize, Becomes First Southern Auto Plant To Do So In 80 Years

Electrek has learned that Volkswagen's Chattanooga, Tennessee plant, where the ID.4 is made, has voted to unionize in a historic move. The vote went 73% in favor to 27% against, with over 3,600 votes cast. The move makes the Chattanooga plant the first auto plant in the US south to unionize in 80 years, and it is now the only union plant owned by a foreign automaker in the US.

The vote was opposed by Tennessee's Republican governor, Bill Lee, and Republican governors from other nearby states. Notably, the plant had previously been VW's only non-union plant worldwide. The plant had conducted other union votes in the past, in both 2014 and 2019, but both failed by slim margins. However, the plant has more than doubled in employment since 2019, and, similarly to other industries, there has been a surge in union momentum over the past few years.

VW's decision to bring production of the ID.4 to Chattanooga was in part to gain access to the US EV tax credit. VW has considered bringing production of other EVs to the plant, but it plans to produce the ID.4 there for the time being. The victory was the first test of the UAW's new strategy of unionizing all other US automakers at the same time, and another vote is scheduled for next month at Mercedes' plant in Alabama. If successful, it would mean nearly 10,000 unionized autoworkers in the South over the course of just a few weeks.

Unions have seen a surge in popularity in recent years, but union membership has been down over several decades in the US. As a result, pay hasn't kept pace with worker productivity, and income distribution has become more unequal over time. It's a trend that has affected other countries as well. Countries with high levels of labor organization tend to have more fair wealth distribution across the economy and more ability for workers to get their fair share. This is seen in Sweden right now as Tesla workers are striking for better conditions. With 90% collective bargaining coverage, Sweden tends to have a happy and well-paid workforce, and it seems clear that these two things are correlated.

Title: VW's Chattanooga Plant Votes To Unionize, Becomes First Southern Auto Plant To Do So In 80 Years Content: ## VW's Chattanooga Plant Votes To Unionize, Becomes First Southern Auto Plant To Do So In 80 Years

Electrek has learned that Volkswagen's Chattanooga, Tennessee plant, where the ID.4 is made, has voted to unionize in a historic move. The vote went 73% in favor to 27% against, with over 3,600 votes cast. The move makes the Chattanooga plant the first auto plant in the US south to unionize in 80 years, and it is now the only union plant owned by a foreign automaker in the US.

The vote was opposed by Tennessee's Republican governor, Bill Lee, and Republican governors from other nearby states. Notably, the plant had previously been VW's only non-union plant worldwide. The plant had conducted other union votes in the past, in both 2014 and 2019, but both failed by slim margins. However, the plant has more than doubled in employment since 2019, and, similarly to other industries, there has been a surge in union momentum over the past few years.

VW's decision to bring production of the ID.4 to Chattanooga was in part to gain access to the US EV tax credit. VW has considered bringing production of other EVs to the plant, but it plans to produce the ID.4 there for the time being. The victory was the first test of the UAW's new strategy of unionizing all other US automakers at the same time, and another vote is scheduled for next month at Mercedes' plant in Alabama. If successful, it would mean nearly 10,000 unionized autoworkers in the South over the course of just a few weeks.

Unions have seen a surge in popularity in recent years, but union membership has been down over several decades in the US. As a result, pay hasn't kept pace with worker productivity, and income distribution has become more unequal over time. It's a trend that has affected other countries as well. Countries with high levels of labor organization tend to have more fair wealth distribution across the economy and more ability for workers to get their fair share. This is seen in Sweden right now as Tesla workers are striking for better conditions. With 90% collective bargaining coverage, Sweden tends to have a happy and well-paid workforce, and it seems clear that these two

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